Healthcare News

  • Managing Pain in Shoulder Arthroplasty Patients

    Regional anesthesia – specifically, interscalene blocks – have been advocated as an alternative to intravenous opioids to manage pain in patients undergoing primary shoulder arthroplasty. They’ve generally done a good job of providing analgesia. [1-3] The problem, as described by Thomas (Quin) Throckmorton, MD, during a presentation at ICJR’s 7th Annual Shoulder Course, is that interscalene blocks are associated with some pretty serious side effects, including respiratory side effects similar to those associated with opioid use.

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  • Long-term outcomes of total elbow arthroplasty for distal humeral fracture: results from a prior randomized clinical trial

    Total elbow arthroplasty (TEA) is a reliable treatment for elderly patients with comminuted intra-articular distal humeral fractures. However, the longevity and long-term complications associated with this procedure are unknown. The objectives of this study were to examine long-term outcomes and implant survival in elderly patients undergoing TEA for fracture.

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  • Bilateral Reverse Total Shoulder Arthroplasty for 2 Different Etiologies

    Reverse total shoulder arthroplasty (RTSA) was originally designed for the treatment of end-stage rotator cuff arthropathy. Prior to its development, the best option for patients with this disease was a hemiarthroplasty, which helped with pain relief but was not as reliable for restoring shoulder function.

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  • Link found between gut bacteria, successful joint replacement

    Having healthy gut flora—the trillions of bacteria housed in our intestines—could lower the risk of infection following knee and hip replacement surgeries, while an unhealthy intestinal flora may increase the risk of infection.

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  • Surgery or No Surgery: What’s the Best Option for Rotator Cuff Tears?

    When a patient presents with signs and symptoms of a rotator cuff tear, should a surgical procedure be done right away? The answer depends on certain factors, according to Jay D. Keener, MD, from Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri

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